Six Beautifully Wacky Italian Movie Posters At The Poster Museum

For the cinephile who hankers for the most obscure and lovely filmic eye candy, it’s not a bad idea to peruse the mountains of vintage posters at the Philip Williams Poster Museum (122 Chambers Street) — specifically, their infinite collection of movie posters. Pick any genre or foreign language, and you’ll find an abundance. A Return of the Jedi one-sheet in Polish but with an exploding Vader helmet? Absolutely did not happen in Episode VI, but okay here it is! Or, say, you’re a fan of campy monster flicks with Italian translations? Not a problem — see below for a handful of eccentric wonders that recently caught our eye.  

Freddy’s Dead: The Final Nightmare

Cameos from Roseanne Barr and Tom Arnold didn’t exactly salvage one of the arguably weaker installments of the franchise, but there’s nothing wrong with adorning your living room with this southern European twist on the Nightmare series.  

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The Cat from Outer Space

Who among us doesn’t need a print of this 1978 Disney production starring the lovely Sandy Duncan? It’s what all the kids are talking about these days. (Okay, but seriously it looks amazing — admit it.)  

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The Horror of Frankenstein

Go meta with this spoof of a remake of the 1931 classic, based on a novel. 

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Godzilla vs. Mechagodzilla

Extra terrestrials send a robot version of Godzilla to planet Earth in the hopes of destroying humanity. That’s honestly enough info if anyone asks about it when they come over.

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Planet of Storms

Cosmonauts fight dinosaurs on the planet Venus (I think) in this Russian 1962 title. Makes sense. 

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Mondo Cane

This graphic horror documentary may have polarized audiences upon release, but its Italian poster is sure to impress even the most squeamish crowds. But, again, if this one’s too taboo for your walls, then you can always revert back to that Polish Return of the Jedi print.

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Check out more pieces at the Philip Williams Poster Museum.

—Emma Fecko